My Blog
By Barbara Preussner, DMD
August 10, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Crowns  

Find out how dental crowns protect and preserve your natural teeth.

Having a healthy smile is something that everyone strives for; however, everything from a sports injury to decay can weaken and damage teeth. Luckily, when these issues arise our

Holliston, MA, dentist Dr. Barbara Preussner can treat and restore the tooth with a dental crown, a tooth-shaped cap that fits over the crown of a natural tooth to provide a natural-looking protective barrier.

You could benefit from getting a dental crown if you have,

  • A severely decayed tooth that a dental filling can’t completely support
  • Experienced a traumatic injury to a tooth that has caused it to fracture, break or crack
  • A severely disfigured or discolored tooth
  • A weak tooth that is prone to crumbling or cracking
  • A tooth that needs to undergo root canal therapy
  • One or more missing teeth and you are getting a dental implant or dental bridge

If our Holliston, MA, restorative dentist has told you that you need a dental crown here are some of the benefits of getting this dental cap,

Improved appearance: No matter whether a tooth is severely discolored, misshapen or damaged, the fact of the matter is that the tooth sticks out and affects the overall appearance of your smile. Luckily, dental crowns are made from material that looks like a real tooth, which means that the crown can instantly improve the color, shape and size of a tooth once it’s cemented into place.

Confidence in chewing: You don’t realize just how important your teeth are for eating until you have broken or damaged tooth. Not being able to use all of your teeth can make eating certain foods challenging or even impossible. Unfortunately, untreated dental problems are more likely to cause digestive issues and nutritional deficits. To prevent these problems a dental crown can be placed over a weak or damaged tooth to almost fully restore strength and functionality back into it so you can eat what you want again.

Preserve your smile: The best thing you can do for your oral health is to maintain your own natural teeth. This means placing a dental crown over a cracked, damaged or infected tooth after it’s been treated. While some of the tooth will be filed down to make room for the crown, this is preferable to having a tooth extracted.

Have questions about dental crowns or any of the restorative, cosmetic or preventive dental care that we offer here in Holliston, MA? If so, call our office today. We would be happy to answer your questions and schedule your next cleaning or consultation.

WisdomTeethCanStillbeaProblemfortheWorldsYoungestBillionaire

According to Forbes Magazine, Kylie Jenner is the world's youngest billionaire at age 22. Daughter of Caitlyn (Bruce) Jenner and Kris Jenner, Kylie is the founder and owner of the highly successful Kylie Cosmetics, and a rising celebrity in her own right. But even this busy CEO couldn't avoid an experience many young people her age go through each year: having her wisdom teeth removed.

At around 10 million removals each year, wisdom teeth extraction is the most common surgical procedure performed by oral surgeons. Also called the third molars, the wisdom teeth are in the back corners of the jaws, top and bottom. Most people have four of them, but some have more, some have fewer, and some never have any. They're typically the last permanent teeth to come in, usually between ages 17 and 25.

And therein lies the problem with wisdom teeth: Many times, they're coming in late on a jaw already crowded with teeth. Their eruption can cause these other teeth to move out of normal alignment, or the wisdom teeth themselves may not fully erupt and remain fully or partially within the gums (a condition called impaction). All of this can have a ripple effect, decreasing dental function and increasing disease risk.

As Kylie Jenner has just experienced, they're often removed when problems with bite or instances of diseases like tooth decay or gum disease begin to show. But not just when problems show: It's also been a common practice to remove them earlier in a kind of “preemptive strike” against dental dysfunction. But this practice of early wisdom teeth extraction has its critics. The main contention is that early extractions aren't really necessary from a medical or dental standpoint, and so patients are unduly exposed to surgical risks. Although negative outcomes are very rare, any surgical procedure carries some risk.

Over the last few years, a kind of middle ground consensus has developed among dentists on how to deal with wisdom teeth in younger patients. What has emerged is a “watch and wait” approach: Don't advise extraction unless there is clear evidence of developing problems. Instead, continue to monitor a young patient's dental development to see that it's progressing normally.

Taking this approach can lead to fewer early wisdom teeth extractions, which are postponed to a later time or even indefinitely. The key is to always do what's best for a patient's current development and future dental health.

Still, removing wisdom teeth remains a sound practice when necessary. Whether for a high school or college student or the CEO of a large company, wisdom teeth extraction can boost overall dental health and development.

If you would like more information about wisdom teeth and their impact on dental health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth: To Be or Not to Be?

By Barbara Preussner, DMD
August 07, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: veneers  

Do you want to feel more confident in your smile? Here’s how veneers can help.

 

Perhaps you’ve heard about dental veneers before, particularly from a celebrity or someone whose smile you love. Of course, you don’t veneershave to be walking down the red carpet or starring in a TV show to consider dental veneers. Any healthy individual can get the smile they want when they turn to our Holliston MA dentist Dr. Barbara Preussner for porcelain veneers.

 

What are Holliston porcelain veneers?

Veneers are thin, durable coverings that bond directly to the front of your teeth to hide a multitude of cosmetic imperfections. Veneers are fully customized based on the size of your teeth and the results you’re looking to achieve. Common problems that porcelain veneers can hide include:

 

  • Misshapen or oddly shaped teeth
  • Size issues (teeth that are too short or uneven)
  • Discolorations and widespread stains
  • Gaps between teeth
  • Chipped teeth
  • Worn teeth
  • Gummy smiles
  • Slightly crooked or misaligned teeth

 

What are the benefits of getting porcelain veneers?

As anyone who has gotten Holliston Porcelain Veneers will be able to tell you, these simple restorations can go a long way to dramatically improving the overall appearance of your smile. Some of the benefits of porcelain veneers include:

 

  • A quick and easy way to enhance and improve your smile
  • Long-lasting results
  • A stain-resistant smile
  • A stronger and more resilient smile
  • Restorations that can last to 15 years before needing to be replaced
  • A straighter smile without having to get braces
  • Taking years off your appearance and making you look younger
  • Boosting your self-esteem and confidence
  • Smiling more, which is always great for your health and wellbeing

 

Am I a good candidate for dental veneers?

If you are an adult with a healthy smile but wish that your teeth were whiter, straighter, or more even then chances are good that you could be an ideal candidate for veneers. Whether you want to improve the appearance of one, three, or all teeth that are visible when you smile, our dental team can make this possible with the help of Holliston Porcelain Veneers.

 

Whether you have questions about porcelain veneers or you want to find out if you’re an ideal candidate, don’t hesitate to call our Holliston MA dental practice today at (508) 429-7125 to schedule your no-risk consultation with Dr. Barbara Preussner.

ImplantsMakeDenturesMoreSecureComfortableandBone-Friendly

Even in the 21st Century, losing most or all of your teeth is still an unfortunate possibility. Many in this circumstance turn to dentures, as their great-grandparents did, to restore their teeth. But today's dentures are much different from those of past generations—and dental implants are a big reason why.

The basic denture is made of a gum-colored, acrylic base with artificial teeth attached. The base is precisely made to fit snugly and comfortably on the patient's individual gum and jaw structure, as the bony ridges of the gums provide the overall support for the denture.

Implants improve on this through two possible approaches. A removable denture can be fitted with a metal frame that firmly connects with implants embedded in the jaw. Alternatively, a denture can be permanently attached to implants with screws. Each way has its pros and cons, but both have two decided advantages over traditional dentures.

First, because implants rather than the gums provide their main support, implant-denture hybrids are often more secure and comfortable than traditional dentures. As a result, patients may enjoy greater confidence while eating or speaking wearing an implant-based denture.

They may also improve bone health rather than diminish it like standard dentures. This is because the forces generated when chewing and eating travel from the teeth to the jawbone and stimulate new bone cell growth to replace older cells. We lose this stimulation when we lose teeth, leading to slower bone cell replacement and eventually less overall bone volume.

Traditional dentures not only don't restore this stimulation, they can also accelerate bone loss as they rub against the bony ridges of the gums. Implants, on the other hand, can help slow or stop bone loss. The titanium in the imbedded post attracts bone cells, which then grow and adhere to the implant surface. Over time, this can increase the amount of bone attachment and help stymie any further loss.

An implant-supported denture is more expensive than a standard denture, but far less than replacing each individual tooth with an implant. If you want the affordability of dentures with the added benefits of implants, this option may be worth your consideration.

If you would like more information on implant-supported restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Overdentures & Fixed Dentures.”

StopPlaqueBuildupAroundYourImplant-SupportedBridgeWithFlossing

Losing your teeth can be a traumatic experience with serious consequences for your overall health. Fortunately, you have great options for replacing lost teeth that can restore both appearance and dental function.

One such option is a fixed bridge supported by dental implants. While implants are best known for single tooth replacement, they can also be used with other restorations like bridges. In this case, the bridge is screwed into a few well-placed implants to support it.

Implants can provide bridges with more security and support, and without the need to alter adjacent teeth that are commonly used for traditional tooth replacement. They may also slow or stop bone loss because the titanium in implants naturally attracts bone cells that grow and adhere to its surface and provide stimulation to the bone cells during function.

Because of these benefits an implant-supported bridge could be a life-changer that provides years of satisfaction. But we can’t simply “set them and forget them”: They require dedicated oral hygiene just like natural teeth.

While the bridge materials and implants themselves are in no danger from disease, the same can’t be said for the implant’s supporting gums and bone. Dental plaque, the main driver in gum disease, can place these tissues at risk for infection that could eventually lead to implant failure.

It’s important, then, for you to floss around your new implants to remove any plaque. This differs from regular flossing in which you work the thread between teeth. Instead, you’ll have to maneuver the floss between the bridge and gums with the help of a floss threader, a small slender tool with a loop at one end and a stiffer plastic edge at the other (similar to a sewing needle).

To use it, first run 18” of floss through the loop until you get equal lengths and then work the tail of the floss threader between the bridge and gums while holding one end of the floss. Once through, you pull the floss threader through so that the floss is on either side of the bridge. Then grab each end of the floss and pull it snug to floss up and down one side of the implant. Go to the next side and repeat this procedure for all the implants.

As an alternative, you could use an oral irrigator, which emits a pulsating spray of water to loosen and wash away plaque. Either way, though, it’s important to floss around implants to get the most life out of your bridge.

If you would like more information on proper care for implant-supported restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Hygiene for Fixed Bridgework.”





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